EADiva has just migrated to a static site. If you see broken links or behavioral errors, please let me know.

<custodhist> Custodial History

<custodhist> encodes information about the chain of ownership of the described materials before they reached the immediate source of acquisition, which is encoded in <acqinfo>. This information about previous ownership may include both physical and intellectual ownership and whatever details may be significant for authority, integrity, and interpretations. While this may include provenance, it may be more appropriate to describe provenance in <origination>, <bioghist>, or <scopecontent>.

<custodhist> is one of the elements which may be used within <archdesc>, <archdescgrp>, <c>, <c01> through <c12>, and <descgrp>.

Attributes

  • ALTRENDER – not required. Use if the content of the element should be displayed or printed differently than the rendering established in a style sheet for other occurrences of the element.
  • AUDIENCE – not required. Use to set whether the element’s contents will be visible to external users or to internal ones. Possible values are: “internal” and “external.”
  • ID – not required. Creates an ID for element. Can be used for linking.
  • ENCODINGANALOG – not required. May contain information to map this tag to a particular element in another schema.

Subelements

<custodhist> may contain further <custodhist> elements, as well as <acqinfo>, <address>, <blockquote>, <chronlist>, <head>, <list>, <note>, <p>, and <table>. Note, since PCDATA is not used within this element, it serves as a wrapper, at least of a <p> element containing the actual text.

DACS

See DACS Section 5.1, Custodial history. Added value. (DACS 2013, p.63)

Examples

Two examples of how <custodhist> may be used:

<custodhist>
	<p>Letters from the Philippines were kept by Mary Jean Bell until after Sarah J. Bell Kitchin's death in 2010. They were then transferred to Ruth Kitchin Tillman, who donated them to this archive.</p>
	<p>Letters from the USSR were kept by Constance J. Lindgreen until after Sarah J. Bell Kitchin's death in 2010. They were then transferred to Ruth Kitchin Tillman, who donated them to this archive.</p>
	<p>Letters received by Sarah J. Bell Kitchin were found in her attic after her death in 2010 and passed in 2012 to Ruth Kitchin Tillman.</p>
</custodhist>
<custodhist>
	<head>Custodial History</head>
	<p>A custodial history of the John Smith papers:</p>
	<list>
		<item>Jane Smith collected her father's papers at the time of his death in 1834 and housed them in her attic, where one box suffered some water damage from a leak.</item>
		<item>In 1872, the papers were given to Tom Jones, a biographer of John Smith, with the understanding that he would attempt to find a more suitable home for them after completing his biographical work.</item>
		<item>Tom Jones donated the items to the Harrisburg Historical Society in 1890.</item>
		<item>Upon liquidation of the Harrisburg Historical Society in 1932, this collection was donated to the Pennsylvania Historical Society.</item>
	</list>
</custodhist>

EAD tag library entry for <custodhist>.